Monthly Archives: October 2014

My Writing Process

Lately more and more people have been asking me about my writing process. This interest probably stems from my comments about editing. Friends, family, and sometimes even strangers are intrigued. They want to peek inside my brain to see what writing is like for me. It’s crazy.

I’m simultaneously puzzled and flattered by the curiosity. Let’s be frank: I’m nothing close to Stephen King. No matter how small-time I feel, I’m happy to oblige. Whether I’m writing a blog post, a short story, or a novel, this is basically my writing process.

1. Inspiration. The madness starts when an idea falls into my head, seemingly from out of nowhere. Sadly there isn’t an Idea Store. Whenever an idea comes to me, I record it and work on fleshing it out. Fun fact: I don’t outline.

2. First draft. I get this sucker down as fast as I can. When it comes to first drafts, it’s okay write crap. Even if I feel like what I’m writing is abysmal, I focus on getting it down somewhere. You can fix a bad page; you can’t fix a blank one. I can write the first draft of a blog post in half an hour, a shorty story in an hour, and a novel in six weeks.

3. Cooling off. I don’t have much of a cooling off period for blog posts. For short stories, I tend to wait about a day before diving into revision. For novels, I can take anywhere from one to three months. I like to distance myself from the material. The more objectivity I can approach it with, the better.

4. Read through and notes. This part is painful. By this point I’ve forgotten how awful my first draft is and am not looking forward to reminding myself. Once I’ve printed my work out or exported it to my Kindle (so I’m not tempted to edit as I read), I go through it in one sitting and make note of what needs fixing.

5. Second draft. Armed with my notes and a plan of attack, I dive headfirst into revision. Sometimes this means minor changes. More often than not, it means a nearly complete rewrite. The YA novel I’m editing at the moment is the latter. It’s a struggle.

6. Rinse and repeat. Keep going until you can’t edit anymore. When it’s finished, you’ll know. Reward yourself for your hard work and work on publication!

The time it takes me to complete a project may vary, but on the whole, this is my general writing process. Feel free to try out my system for yourself. Remember, however, that the ideal writing process is whichever one works best for you.

What’s your writing process like? What are you currently working on?

How to Increase Your Writing Speed

Speedometer

When it comes to drafting, some writers feel that slower is better. I’m not one of them. The key to finishing first drafts is to get everything down. Deliberation will only hurt you when it comes to drafting and should be saved for revision. Want to finish your project? You need to write faster. Want to write faster? I can give you some advice. If you follow these tips, you should increase your writing speed in no time.

Write or Die. I’ve talked about this web app before. Ava Jae introduced me to it and now I’m in love. It changed my life. You enter your word count goal, set the timer, and write. If you get distracted, you’re in trouble. Let me know if you’d like me to share my settings with you.

Beat the clock. If Write or Die is too scary for you, set your own timer and race against the clock. Stick with something small–5,10, or 15 minutes should be plenty of time. You’ll be amazed what you can accomplish in such a short interval.

Writing sprints. Lately I’ve become a fan of writing sprints on Twitter. For a set amount of time (I like 15 minutes), you invite people to write with you. The goal is to write as much as you can in that time span. This technique is fun because you can get a lot done in a short amount of time. Also it’s great having other people there to hold you accountable. If writing sprints sound appealing to you, join in on the fun by following me on Twitter.

Outlines. Some people swear by outlines. I personally don’t like them. Do whatever works for you. Outlines can help you write faster by knowing what comes next. If you like planning, outlining can certainly help you increase your writing speed.

How do you get to Carnegie Hall? Practice, practice, practice. If you’re truly dedicated, the best way to increase your writing speed is to write every day. Write as much as you can whenever you can and you’ll be sure to see results.

You can write faster, I promise. All it takes is a few small changes. Try out these techniques and see what happens. You might surprise yourself with how fast you finish.

What do you think of these tips? Do you have any advice about how to increase your writing speed?

P.S. Pen vs. Paper: A Pros and Cons List and NaNoWriMo Tips